(602) 321-6847 Paul's cell to talk western art and paint

A western artist in oils... with the 'spurs a-jingling'

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Welcome to my world of Western Oil Paint

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Introduction

Artist Statement

Artist Statement

Welcome to my ( western art ) world of cowboys, Indians and horses... and an occasional buffalo. I'm definitely a western artist that is passionate about his oil paint.
    During the last half of the 1800’s in America, there was a continued migration called the westward movement of a people that possessed something distinctive. They had not been directed by a higher power, a chieftain, king, general or a messiah. They were individuals making  personal decisions to fulfill personal dreams... in this they differed from almost all other migrations in history. This is not, in any way, to forget the natives who were there long before; in fact they are among my most treasured subjects. My statement is nonpolitical. It is a celebration in oils of all these peoples and places who continue to embody the American West...  in legend and in truth...  

                                     
    
...to those who follow their dreams.

May all these peoples continue to ‘live’ through those of us who idolize what so often is confused with myth. My hope is to pay service to them and to my collectors who decorate their homes and spaces with these images.
     
602-321-6847 cell                    (mountain time)

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Artist Statement

Artist Statement

Artist Statement

   Paul Jones was born (1946) and raised in Missouri and Illinois but the minute he was in South Dakota via the Air Force, he was ‘in the west’ and there was no looking back. He met his future wife Cheryl in Rapid City, and again there was no looking back.
    It’s been said of L’Amour, that he lived the lives of his subjects. “I too have ridden the trails of the west and sat at many a cowboy fire,” states Paul. “I’ve ridden many seasons in Yellowstone with cowboy ‘Bullwhip Bob’ and in the Dakotas, Montana, Wyoming and Arizona. But the  others are the real cowboys; I’m basically a country-casual boy. I would not be terribly useful at a roping or branding. Except for coffee; I’m pretty good at that.”  “Others build various products, I build oil paintings,” states Paul. “I love everything about the craft of western art, but at heart, as a western artist, I see the challenge of constructing an image and go to it with any means and talent possible.” Paul studied oils and journalism in college leaving early to spend his military Vietnam years assigned to Africa. But his real instruction he feels has come from the thousands of sources available in books and galleries...
      “I’ve been pleasing people with their own image for many years* but along the way I also satisfied art directors with my commercial photography by designing and lighting sets to create a specific mood. What good fortune that was!”          
    “I have spent countless hours and days intensely studying thousands of oils available throughout the west... but it’s the Cowboys, Indians, horses and the vast landscapes that hold me the longest. What ‘kid’ of the "Fifties" didn't want to play Cowboys and Indians and get lost in the west!”
     Paul and his wife Cheryl live in South Dakota and Arizona. They traveled continuously for over eight years in their bus conversion the ‘WanderingStar’. Paul considered the voyage his chrysalis for transforming from photographer to canvas artist. They have a son Travis and
daughter in law Rebekah in Phoenix.

“Regardless the tools to capture and explore visionary concepts, in the final analysis it is my oils on my canvas that speaks to the public for better or worse. Much of what is available for viewing is non-objective art. I have an objective...a pleasing palette transferred to a pleasing canvas with a bit of abstraction to tease the senses... to pull the eye in.  Under the best of conditions, the viewer falls into the picture rather than colliding with the surface...”
   *Mr. Jones has had the pleasure of making personal portraits of many people of note. Lady Margaret Thatcher, Colin Powell, President George W. Bush, Dan Quayle, F.W. de Klerk, Carl Sagan, Kevin Costner, Garth Brooks, Reba McEntire, Phyllis Diller, Steve Allen, Jay Leno, Carol Burnett, Malcolm Forbes, Willie Nelson, John Denver, Gordon Lightfoot, Peter Fonda, etc. etc. are among those who have posed for Paul. His work has been featured in National Geographic, Midwest Living, (Meredith Corp.) Ford Times, used in publications of T.W.A. Services, General Motors, Montgomery Ward, Nissan Motors, Northwestern Bell, etc. etc.
     Paul also was a major contributer to the Abrams coffee table publication by Lois Sherr Dubin, “North American Indian Jewelry and Adornment”.

Journal

The Making of A Composition/Painting or On the Easel

The Making of "Buffalo Medicine"

The Making of "Buffalo Medicine"

The Making of "Buffalo Medicine"

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I will begin, and hope to continue the building of particular paintings. 

First sketching on canvas

The Making of "Buffalo Medicine"

The Making of "Buffalo Medicine"

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Beginning early sketching and placement of characters. Much scribbling.

The Making of "Buffalo Medicine"

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Filling some background for edges and to determine values.  I'll often work with a light wash of Burnt Umber then darker... hunting values which can set overall 'voice' of piece 

Sometimes things don't work

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Pre-sketched faces for reference. Note 'leader' or 'chief' head dressing and style. I wanted to try for an older/elderly man

Sometimes things don't work

Sometimes things don't work

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In previous shot the original buffalo head dress was sketched in.  But I still wanted to try an older work-up with this character....

Sometimes things don't work

Sometimes things don't work

Sometimes things don't work

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Close, perhaps, but no cigar. I'll go back to my original conceptual of buffalo head dress.

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Back to the left side of painting.  Often work from left to right if for no other reason than to keep from dragging paint with hand. A practice often broken

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Working my first full character. Modifications will follow thru out on this whole composition because it is truly a 'work' in progress.....

.....more to follow..... 

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Coming soon.... The Making of "Red, White & Blur III"

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